Espectacular España: Ronda

A few years ago while perusing other traveler blog posts, I came across one about Ronda, Spain. Up to that point, I hadn’t even heard of this little town in the middle of nowhere. The blogger’s pictures of a town perched on a cliff overlooking a gorgeous gorge was all it took for me to put it on the list! We spent one night in this little town just long enough to be able to meander down to see the gorge from below and take in the beauty of one of the largest ‘White Hill’ towns in Spain; it’s all the time you really need there.  A lot of folks actually try to do this as a day trip from Seville or Granada (albeit, a bit rushed). I feel like the more Hubs and I travel, the more we want to take our time in each place and be part of the scenery, instead of only seeing it from behind our cameras.   We’ve been privileged to have enough time to “smell the roses”, but it’s definitely not taken for granted.

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In addition to the gorge, we also learned that Ronda is the birthplace of modern Spanish bullfighting. This town is home to the oldest bullring in Spain. We made it just an hour before it closed, so we practically had the whole place to ourselves to explore. It’s quite amazing to see where the bulls are held and if you looked closely at the inside of the doors, you can see all sorts of horn gouges on the inside of the stall doors.

Side story at the Ronda bullring:  Hubs was off on his own taking a few photos at the horse stables, but needed to put his phone through the window bars to take some photos.  He got a couple, and then ‘oooops!’, he dropped his phone from about 10 feet, down into the horse stable courtyard.  The courtyard was inaccessible by visitors and he had to go ask for help with his broken Spanish, and even had to mime riding a horse to tell them where it was :’-)  He would have used Google translate, but ‘oooops!’ again, he didn’t have his phone.  The staff giggled a bit at his misfortune, but were very nice and helpful to retrieve it.  While we were waiting, one of the horses witnessed what was going on and stuck his tongue out at Hubs, almost laughing at him too.  In the end, Hubs was lucky the phone was in a case and uninjured from fall.

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Espectacular España: Granada

Granada means pomegranate in Spanish, sits in the foothills of the Sierra Nevadas, and is home to the famous Alhambra.  Interesting fact:  Any Spanish word beginning with “Al-” was derived from Arabic, there are at least 4000+ Spanish words contributed from Arabic.  This was our second stop and one of my absolute favorites of our trip. This town had character and grit.  You could tell the Islamic influence was much greater in this city than Sevilla, and it’s something that’s celebrated and adds to the mix of cultures there. In addition, the history and architecture were just as fascinating.

The Alhambra is the last and greatest Moorish palace. It’s also the main attraction visitors from all over the world come to see. Many bloggers and sites strongly advise  you to buy your Alhambra tickets before your plane ticket, so that you have a reservation to plan your trip around the palace.  This place is very popular and permits a limited number of guests per day to preserve the site (~6600). The ticketing system had changed since I purchased our tickets months ago, therefore, you may have to dig a littler deeper into what pre-buying entails. Regardless, I can’t stress this enough- if you are traveling a long way and this is one of your absolute “must-sees”, you better make sure you have tickets, because you might be sorely disappointed if you can’t get in.  If you’ve read my Sevilla post, I also stressed online reservations for other “must-see” sights in that city too – a recurring theme.

Now, let’s talk about the seeing Alhambra.  The palace sits on a hill, which overlooks Granada, as a display of power and oversight when the Sultans ruled.  The grounds include not only the palace, but a fort, Charles V’s palace (built later), and gardens.  Picture it, the year was 1333 (Alhambra completed), mainland Europe was still steeped in the Dark Ages where poverty, ignorance, superstition, and illiteracy reigned supreme.  The Moors (Arabs) in southern Spain, comparatively, brought education, mathematics, philosophy, etc…from Northern Africa.  This part of Europe flourished during this time under Moorish rule.  One of the major themes of the Alhambra palace was the use of water features.  For the Moors, water was the greatest symbol of life.  In the palace there were pools, fountains, and other water features sourced from the mountain springs.  The Moors brought the technological know how of running water.  Everywhere in the palace there was water features and gurgling sounds.  Along with the water features, every inch of the interior walls were carved with intricate geometric designs along with Arabic script.  Where there weren’t carvings, tiles with symmetric geometric designs adorned the walls.  In every room you entered I would look down and see water, look to the walls for carvings, and then the ceilings had hand sculpted stalactites hanging from the ceilings.  The ceilings were beautiful in every room.  It’s hard to describe the inside completely, because if I did this entry would be about five to ten pages long.  Suffice it to say, there’s nothing I’ve ever seen like this, and it really is something you have to see once in your life.

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The Albaicín (or Albayzín) is Spain’s best old Moorish quarter and it’s also a definite must to just wander and get lost through all the narrow and maze-like streets. There’s also the San Nicolas viewpoint which has that iconic breathtaking view of the Alhambra. It’s so picturesque that Hubs and I went twice during our visit. We also found a family owned authentic Moroccan restaurant and it turned out to be one the best meals we had during our entire Spain trip.

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As per Rick Steve’s recommendation, Hubs and I signed up for an olive oil tasting tour. We had a small group of 8 people. The tour started off at the oldest preserved olive oil mill in Spain, that’s now turned into a museum. We then walked around some olive tree groves and came across olive trees that were 500+ years old (one pictured below) – they can produce olives for well over 1000+ years. I didn’t know olive trees could live that long!  There were several nearby in the same age range. Another fun fact is that Spain is the largest producer of olive oil. So, that Italian olive oil that is on your kitchen shelf- it may contain Spanish oil and then topped off with some Italian oil in order to market it as Italian olive oil.  Italy’s olive oil trees were affected by disease several years ago and they’re still not able to keep up with demand. After the tour info and sights, we got to the fun part, the tasting! They had us set up with what official olive oil tasters would use – dark blue glasses with a glass lid on top. Tasting is similar to how you would with wine. Take a sip, let it sit in your mouth, swish it around, and then swallow. The more “peppery” it feels in your throat equals freshness of the oil. I learned a few tricks of how the Spanish use the olive oils and can’t wait to incorporate them into our daily life. I, of course, couldn’t walk away without purchasing several bottles of the ones we liked.  I only wish we had more space in our luggage to bring back more.

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Espectacular España: Sevilla

Hubs and I  just returned from spending 17 days in Spain using the high speed rail and a rental car. Southern Spain has been on my must-see list since we moved to Europe in early 2013, and we’ve actually planned this trip several times in the past few years – only to replace it with another destination for one reason or another. Finally, we made it happen.  We started off by flying into Madrid from Vienna, and then catching a 2.5 hr AVE high-speed train (165mph!) a few hours later to Sevilla – a city known for flamenco, tapas, and an unmistakeable building/architectural style.

One of the main attractions in Seville is the Royal Alcázar. It’s a palace built by the Moors in the 10th century, but was rebuilt in the 14th century by Muslim workmen for a Christian king. Therefore, there are many Islamic influences and details throughout; and if you’re a Game of Thrones fan, you’ll recognize it as the filming location for “Dorne”. Instead of being one of those people who are “less than prepared, fly-by-the-seat-of-your-pants, just show up, obnoxiously loud, do everything for me” (don’t be that person) traveler who waits until the last minute and stand in the queue that snakes around the building further than the eye can see…buy your tickets (way) in advance with a reserved time slot to enter.  You still have to wait a bit (<15 mins), but it’s definitely much faster. Or, another option is to book a private tour that ushers you straight in and get a lively history lesson while walking through, instead of those awful self-audio guides. The intricacies of this place was jaw dropping. Every corner you turn there are beautiful carvings and details that make you stop and think about all those artisans that made this palace into a work of art and how much time it took. Unbelievable. The gardens are also a sight to behold. We were at the Royal Alcázar for about two hours, but probably could’ve spend a bit more time there.

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Hubs and I also visited another famous sight called the Plaza de España. It’s a square of where the 1929 international fair was held, and the architecture style of that time is still dazzling to this day. The highlights of this place are the trademark Spanish tiles that depict each province of Spain.

Unfortunately in Sevilla, Hubs came down with a stomach bug and while he was recovering at the AirBnB, I went out exploring the beautiful streets and neighborhoods of Sevilla. There were so many nooks and crannies to get lost in and practice taking pictures with my new camera. I found the Metropole Parasol to be a fantastic place to get to try all the different settings on my new toy.

When it was finally time to say goodbye to Sevilla, we made a pit stop just outside of the city in our rental car. Hubs and I took a little detour north to see the Archeological site of Italica. Italica was once a grand Roman city, founded in the south of Spain by Scipio Africanus in 206 BC.  Why are these roman ruins particularly interesting to me? It’s the filming location of the one of the most famous scenes in season 7 of Game of Thrones. Yes, we totally geeked out and had to see the “dragon pit”. Although these ruins aren’t well known, they are now with the help of the hit HBO series. It’s well deserved too, because the well preserved Roman city is definitely worth a visit – even if you don’t follow the show.

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